Laos: a country of beauty in a week

A four hour flight took me from Hanoi to Vientiane. You are explicitly informed on entering the country that possession or consumption of drugs carried the death penalty.

Having only approximately half a day to explore the country’s capital, it was a quick trip to a few places. This included a massive Buddha park where you could climb inside a structure to the top of it and get a good view of the park – these included several steep steps and narrow crevices which were quite tricky to get up and down. This was built in 1958. Then a trip to Pha That Luang which is the national symbol of Laos. Built in the 16th century, it is a grand stupa covered in 500kg of gold and probably contains the ashes of a very rich family. Then went to Patuxay Victory gate which is a gate with great panoramic views from the top. It reminded me of the Arc de Triomphe and took 10 years to construct using funds from the US government as they had initially planned to build a runway there. The last stop was a temple called Hor Pha Keo which used to house the Emerald Buddha that I saw in Bangkok for 200 years until 1779. Then a journey to Vang Vieng which was amazing – the scenery is stunning. It’s very luscious and green with lots of mountains. But it was another drive through torrential rain. Apparently 75% of Laos is mountainous. After arriving in the town, it was time to wander down to the river where there was a good view and a good bar for a sundowner. The town was nice to walk around – there were lots of small businesses. The next day was a day of fun – I went tubing inside a cave where the current was quite strong, then a 5km kayak down the river – I hadn’t kayaked since I was a child but it was good fun and the weather was nice for it. A blue lagoon finished the day and I jumped from the highest branch which was terrifying! I’ve never been great with heights so it was a real challenge, especially with no ‘Health and Safety’ protocol. It was fun though, even with getting water up my nose! A nice evening out and a bit of a boogie was good to finish the day off. Heading out the next day for 8 hours along winding roads was a bit tricky, but at least it was great to look out of the window at the gorgeous views. Arrived at Luang Prabang and explored this lovely town. There was an extensive night market with a little street full of street vendors. Wandering around the town with the French architecture and French bakeries was quaint. I managed to find some great French baguette which cheered me up a heck of a lot! It only occurred to me here how extensive the French colonialism was and how much of Indochina was dominated. I visited the Grand Palace and a couple of temples as well as getting up a few steps to Mount Phousi which had a fantastic view at the top. Up bright and early to witness the local women giving Alms to the monks. This was mainly rice, and was expected to last them for the day ahead. This was quite a humbling experience as this shows you a glimpse into their lives. This sect of Buddhism allows young boys to become a monk if they wish, and this doesn’t have to be a lifelong commitment. They could partake in the way of life for a year only. I did see a monk smoking a cigarette though. The next leg of the journey was two full days along (approximately 20 hours) the Mekong river to get to the Thailand border at Bokeo. It was a lovely slow boat and a stopover for the night was at a local village half way at Pak Nguen. The people were very welcoming and the kids were friendly and playful. Sleeping with a mosquito net, basic bedding and no electricity gives you some perspective – something that I’m all too familiar with. Bed time at last light was done to ensure an early start for farming. The villagers all live until they are around 100 and it was easy to see why – the way of life was hard work, but happy, healthy and relaxed. The scenery along the Mekong was amazing. Little villages and large fields line the mountains along the way with parked boats popping out of the water. The different shades of green and variation in forestry make it look like a carpet or a quilt. Speed boats fly past occasionally disrupting the peace. Fishermen catching food from we also a regular sight. Crossed the border by foot back into Thailand at Chiang Khong and witnessed an almighty storm that evening whilst staying in the town. The black sky frequently lit up, and the wind was so strong that lots of lights wobbled and torrential rain pelted against the buildings for what seemed like ages. Laos has been a country of peaceful beauty. Only having a week to see some of the country has made me appreciate the scenery more. Would definitely like to return – this ‘return to places’ list is growing…..

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