A restbite in Chiang Mai

A 6 hour bus journey with an early start brought me to Chiang Mai. Then it was an afternoon trip to an elephant sanctuary which took a bit of time to get to but it was worth it. While I’ve had a fair share of experience with African elephants, this was different. These were rescue elephants, some of which had had previous injuries from being mistreated. It was amazing being able to feed them and walk round a bit of wilderness with them. And then play with them in the water! Although a few of us were slightly uneased by the amount of elephant poo that seemed to be appearing. They were very happy elephants getting a lot of attention and love from people. I still like the fact that they can just creep up on you without you noticing. Then a night exploring a bit of the night market – it was completely massive. I sense I’ll be returning here. Chiang Mai has a lovely old city wall surrounding it.  Visited the Lost book shop – picked up book about Burma to read. Then visited Wat Chedi Luang temple where there are many old structures – women aren’t allowed in one of the buildings due to menstruation as it ruins the sanctity of the city pillar and causes instability. Construction started here in the 14th century, but the buildings have been affected by earthquakes. Also wandered to Warorot market which was huge. I was able to see a bit of the Sunday night market which was near to where I was staying. While walking around, the national anthem was played over a tannoy at 6pm and everyone stood still and silent until it was finished. So I did too. This plays every day at 8am and 6pm and everyone is meant to respect it.

I lost my pedicure virginity – I’d never had one before but my feet needed sorting. They feel quite nice and refreshed! Then went to have a full body one hour massage at a salon which trains ex female convicts and gives them employment as it can be a tough world upon release. It was a good massage and I felt very relaxed. A quick dive into the hotel pool was also very welcoming. While out in the evening booking a tour for the next day and locating a laundry service, the heavens opened and a torrential downpour lasted several hours. I dived for cover in a place where I could grab a bit to eat which was fairly close to where I was staying. I avoided rice finally!

I visited Wat Phra That Doi Suthep which is slightly outside the city and up a mountain (called Doi Suthep). It’s a sacred site as part of the Buddha’s skeleton was meant to be transported here on a white elephant, who then died. The original stupa was said to be built in 1383. Also went to a nearby village which had a lovely waterfall. Yet another massage in the afternoon (I am getting fairly greedy, I know – but if they are £5, then I’m not complaining). This was a Thai one concentrating on back, neck and shoulders. I was pulled around in odd angles and my bag was walked on. It was very odd. But I felt better after it. Then an easy night with some nice food and Netflix. I did have another couple of massages before I left Chiang Mai – I thought I’d take the most of the opportunity. A foot massage was interesting. I am quite sensitive on certain parts of my feet so I think I was off putting the masseuse a bit!

I took myself off around the city the next morning to see some of the other temples that are dotted around. Wat Suan Dok was first in the west of the city and it houses many stupas which contain the ashes of several of Chiang Mai’s important royal families, as well as the main stupa which holds a relic of the Buddha. Phra Singh Temple was fairly huge with nice grounds surrounding it full of smaller temples and meaningful messages attached to trees. Construction on this site dates back to the mid 14th century. The main building houses an impressive Buddha, and I walked into the main temple when a service was happening – this included lots of younger monks sitting at one side of the room waiting to eat and prayers were being read. I received a blessing from a Buddhist monk and have another bracelet to join the one from Koyasan on my wrist. ​​​

After a nice lunch, I treated myself to an afternoon of book reading and catching up on a few things using the internet – what a treat! Although I did feel that I was wasting my time and not making the most of it but deep down, I knew I needed some downtime.  I then went to Doi Intanon national park and went to the highest point in Thailand at 2500m up. Unfortunately, the weather was rubbish – it was foggy and raining a bit. The waterfalls were amazing, however. Trying to see the two pagodas was interesting with the fog. The views from where they are look incredible, but the weather was disappointing. Oh well! It’s my own fault for coming in the rainy season! A last night to myself wandering around the night market and met some people who dragged me to a cabaret club. This was no ordinary cabaret club as the performances were done by ladyboys. It was very colourful and glamorous.I have enjoyed the opportunity to have 5 nights by myself in one place. I was totally exhausted and it was a luxury to unpack my bag instead of playing lucky dip! I felt relaxed by the end thanks to the many massages and some sleep.

Next stop: Burma!


Laos: a country of beauty in a week

A four hour flight took me from Hanoi to Vientiane. You are explicitly informed on entering the country that possession or consumption of drugs carried the death penalty.

Having only approximately half a day to explore the country’s capital, it was a quick trip to a few places. This included a massive Buddha park where you could climb inside a structure to the top of it and get a good view of the park – these included several steep steps and narrow crevices which were quite tricky to get up and down. This was built in 1958. Then a trip to Pha That Luang which is the national symbol of Laos. Built in the 16th century, it is a grand stupa covered in 500kg of gold and probably contains the ashes of a very rich family. Then went to Patuxay Victory gate which is a gate with great panoramic views from the top. It reminded me of the Arc de Triomphe and took 10 years to construct using funds from the US government as they had initially planned to build a runway there. The last stop was a temple called Hor Pha Keo which used to house the Emerald Buddha that I saw in Bangkok for 200 years until 1779. Then a journey to Vang Vieng which was amazing – the scenery is stunning. It’s very luscious and green with lots of mountains. But it was another drive through torrential rain. Apparently 75% of Laos is mountainous. After arriving in the town, it was time to wander down to the river where there was a good view and a good bar for a sundowner. The town was nice to walk around – there were lots of small businesses. The next day was a day of fun – I went tubing inside a cave where the current was quite strong, then a 5km kayak down the river – I hadn’t kayaked since I was a child but it was good fun and the weather was nice for it. A blue lagoon finished the day and I jumped from the highest branch which was terrifying! I’ve never been great with heights so it was a real challenge, especially with no ‘Health and Safety’ protocol. It was fun though, even with getting water up my nose! A nice evening out and a bit of a boogie was good to finish the day off. Heading out the next day for 8 hours along winding roads was a bit tricky, but at least it was great to look out of the window at the gorgeous views. Arrived at Luang Prabang and explored this lovely town. There was an extensive night market with a little street full of street vendors. Wandering around the town with the French architecture and French bakeries was quaint. I managed to find some great French baguette which cheered me up a heck of a lot! It only occurred to me here how extensive the French colonialism was and how much of Indochina was dominated. I visited the Grand Palace and a couple of temples as well as getting up a few steps to Mount Phousi which had a fantastic view at the top. Up bright and early to witness the local women giving Alms to the monks. This was mainly rice, and was expected to last them for the day ahead. This was quite a humbling experience as this shows you a glimpse into their lives. This sect of Buddhism allows young boys to become a monk if they wish, and this doesn’t have to be a lifelong commitment. They could partake in the way of life for a year only. I did see a monk smoking a cigarette though. The next leg of the journey was two full days along (approximately 20 hours) the Mekong river to get to the Thailand border at Bokeo. It was a lovely slow boat and a stopover for the night was at a local village half way at Pak Nguen. The people were very welcoming and the kids were friendly and playful. Sleeping with a mosquito net, basic bedding and no electricity gives you some perspective – something that I’m all too familiar with. Bed time at last light was done to ensure an early start for farming. The villagers all live until they are around 100 and it was easy to see why – the way of life was hard work, but happy, healthy and relaxed. The scenery along the Mekong was amazing. Little villages and large fields line the mountains along the way with parked boats popping out of the water. The different shades of green and variation in forestry make it look like a carpet or a quilt. Speed boats fly past occasionally disrupting the peace. Fishermen catching food from we also a regular sight. Crossed the border by foot back into Thailand at Chiang Khong and witnessed an almighty storm that evening whilst staying in the town. The black sky frequently lit up, and the wind was so strong that lots of lights wobbled and torrential rain pelted against the buildings for what seemed like ages. Laos has been a country of peaceful beauty. Only having a week to see some of the country has made me appreciate the scenery more. Would definitely like to return – this ‘return to places’ list is growing…..