Returning to Thailand

After a flight from Yangon to Bangkok, it was time to spend a bit more time in Thailand, as I’d only had a few days in Chiang Mai, and a day or two in Bangkok. A trip to see the Bridge over the River Kwai was a great thing to see although it took a bit of time to get there. A train ride over the “Death Railway” was incredible, if I am able to use that word appropriately. The amount of suffering by the POWs who had to help to construct the railway was horrible. After visiting a local museum where the living and working conditions were shown to be brutal, it was understandable why so many people had such a hard time here. A friend was meant to come with me, but was stuck in Hong Kong where there had been a fierce typhoon, so she stayed there for another day until the weather cleared. The airline then misplaced her luggage, so she arrived in Bangkok and her suitcase hadn’t left Hong Kong yet. Thankfully it got delivered a few hours before our flight to Koh Samui, otherwise it would have been a bit more of a hassle.

The first day on the islands was getting the flight to Koh Samui, and then the ferry to Koh Phangan. A nice relaxing afternoon on Thong Nai Pan Yai beach was welcome. It was peaceful and was meant more for families. Both of us were exhausted after having a few early mornings. We spent the next day relaxing and having a wander around. I have to admit that I got my first bout of proper sunburn at this point even in the semi-shade.The following day we did a snorkelling trip to Koh Tao and saw lots of lovely fish. The speed boat was very bumpy, but fun. I felt as though I wobbled off it when I got back to shore.​​Getting a ferry back to Samui the next day was good, although I left my Vietnamese hat on a minibus en route. I had been carrying it round for a good month or so since leaving Vietnam so was a bit annoyed, even if it was a bit battered. In Samui, we stayed on a more touristy beach – Chaweng Beach – although at the quieter end in a nice little boutique hotel with a pool.A day trip on a jeep exploring the islands was fun – a lot of dirt tracks and good scenery. We sat on the top of the jeep for a bit which was fun and got thrown about (deliberately, of course!).​​The last day was spent relaxing with a massage overlooking the beach. Even if you ask for one type of massage, you typically always get a Thai one where you’re bent about a lot. There was a lot of back cracking, and it was a bit tricky as I am not the most flexible of people, so bending in certain ways is unpleasant. Anyway, I felt a lot better after it. I was nice to walk up and down the beach. I definitely felt the ‘party’ atmosphere closer to the more tourist centered section. If I had been perhaps 5 years younger, I probably wouldn’t have minded, although I did feel quite old. An afternoon reading and nursing the sunburn finished the islands trip.An early flight the next day returned us to Bangkok where I would spend my final day on my own. The week went very quickly, but I think it was just about enough time to do things without getting too bored. I am not the sort of person who can go away and relax on a beach the whole time for a holiday, but having the odd morning or afternoon to read or catch up with friends or life was good. It definitely made me realise how exhausted I had become. A final day in Bangkok was spent without any rushing around or a massive amount of travel – I felt quite lost! An attempt to get into the Sky Bar was ruined by the fact I wasn’t in smart/casual attire. Apparently, a t-shirt and shorts aren’t appropriate. Oh well! A little tuk tuk took me to Chinatown where I found a rooftop bar on top of a hotel where I got a good view of the sunset with a G&T in hand – shame it was Beefeeters though! 

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Tokyo: Japan experience comes to an end

Tokyo is a city that is also different from the other places I have visited in Japan. It is absolutely huge and can take a while to get from one side of the city to the other – not too different from London, I suppose. Spending seven nights here, with a couple of day trips to escape the hustle and bustle has been great and it has been nice to base myself somewhere without constantly having to take my bag everywhere. The hostel was pretty decent and quite close to Tokyo station as well as a metro station and the Imperial Palace and gardens.IMG_4745I walked through them and they were quite pretty in parts. After working out the Metro, I found myself at Shibuya where the big and famous pedestrian crossing is. ​​IMG_4806IMG_4807

​It was such a busy district full of colour and noise. The tall buildings with screens on were quite imposing initially. Lots of billboards climbed up the buildings. I walked up to Harajuku which wasn’t too far away and this was another shopping district known for its trendy fashions which engulf the youth. There is a street called Takeshita Street which was very very busy and full of random shops selling odd things – I even found some Percy Pigs in a sweet shop!IMG_4793IMG_4797IMG_4799IMG_4789There are some places to eat where you choose and pay outside in a little machine and then hand a voucher over inside at the counter when you sit down. IMG_4766Then got a train to Ebisu which was fairly close and had some lovely dim sum at a place called Le Parc but it was a little expensive. IMG_4831A day trip to Kamakura was next which is about an hour out of the central city. This was a lot quieter and had a lot of temples and shrines, as well as a big bronze Amida Buddha (Kotoku-in temple) which was constructed over ten years in the mid 13th century. You could climb inside him and have a look at the construction of the metal work. It was originally located inside a large temple hall, but this was destroyed during a natural disaster. It has been standing in open air since 1495. IMG_4842IMG_4849I found a great little sushi place to grab some lunch in where it was made directly in front of you. I was brave and tried sea urchin – tasted very much like the sea. I also tried some squid crackers which were tasty. IMG_4896IMG_4898IMG_4836I found a temple called Hasedera which was fairly close to the Buddha. It had the largest wooden statue of Kannon (over nine metres!) as well as a pretty garden with lots of different coloured hydrangeas.IMG_4856IMG_4858IMG_4852IMG_4854IMG_4873I also did another day trip to Hakone which was only half an hour away from Tokyo. This was very scenic – lots of lovely luscious mountains. Managed to get to Lake Ashi which took a few trains, a cable car and a bus replacement service (that’s right, they have them here too!) past a clearly active volcano and through some hills. I took a sightseeing boat over the lake with the intention of catching a glance of Mt Fuji but I didn’t see it. I got off the boat and had another look at the lake from the shore. The clouds were low in the sky, but the sun was out and shining nicely. Then, all of a sudden, I saw the top of the mountain! Then went through a nice cedar avenue.IMG_5082IMG_5089IMG_5102IMG_5125IMG_5128

Back in Tokyo and I visited Sensoji Temple (which is Tokyo’s oldest temple), Meiji Jingu Temple (where there is a lovely garden full of irises and ponds), the Tsukiji market and the national museum, as well as a few districts. The Tsukiji market is famous for its daily tuna auction at 3am. Somehow, I didn’t have the will power to witness this although I did go down one rainy morning and sample some of the goods on offer.IMG_4946IMG_4952IMG_4954IMG_4997IMG_4914Barrels of sake (above)IMG_5006I enjoyed getting my feet nibbled by fish – ticklish at first, but then it was ok!IMG_5037IMG_5133Had some lovely tempura and ramen too!IMG_5058Vending machines selling alcohol and cigarettes are on most streets (also in other places around Japan). I found this odd as the legal drinking age in Japan is 20. I see a lot of business man drinking beer on the way to work on the train. Highballs are also a popular drink here – mostly containing whisky – I’ve seen a lot of highball specific bars. There was a place to eat which was run by robots (I didn’t go in because the entrance fee was 8000 Yen – which is £60) and that was not including food….I’ve really enjoyed visiting this varied country. Getting around has been really easy. I still find it odd that smoking is allowed inside certain places, as well as train carriages. Everything is very clean – there are no litter bins on the streets or graffiti. There’s no one eating on the street or chewing gum. Jay walking is something that just isn’t done – everyone waits at the crossing for the green man. The people are all very friendly and polite. Although I came across some travellers from Belgium who had said they were waiting for their friend who was in a Japanese prison cell for letting off a fire extinguisher while drunk. Anyway, next stop – China!

The snow has started…in London…during rush hour

You can sense the tension in the air among the snowflakes falling from the sky….can’t you? 

While I am now safely in the warmth of a South West train carriage heading into London, I am accutely aware of the disappointment of the commuters trying to make their homeward journey. The floor is wet. Glasses are steaming up. My feet are cold. As you’d expect, everyone has their head down either in a device of some kind, a book or a damp copy of The Evening Standard. I, meanwhile, guilty of being one of those people (while writing this), am also listening to ‘Love Will Tear Us Apart’ by Joy Division, and was convinvced I was almost dancing along at one point due to several odd glances from those unhappy commuters who really need to brighten up. My smile soon vanished and I became one of…them…

It’s officially zero degrees and the beginning of January. No one is happy. Snow in London during rush hour adds to the despair as public transport will just seem to…stop. 

Oh well! I’ll just have to find somewhere to build a snowman! If it ever settles…