Kyoto: Temples, Geishas and rain

Well I could hardly expect to come to Japan in the rainy season and not get some rain. The day of travelling from Nara to Kyoto was a washout! My hostel was quite close to a subway and bus stops which was appreciated during the rain. I caught a bus and went off to see Kinkaku-ji, also known as the ‘Golden Pavilion’. Even in the rain, the Zen Buddhist temple was a spectacle from the other side of the lake. You aren’t able to enter it though. Again, this was a temple that has been rebuilt a few times since its construction in the 14th century. IMG_4274I’m getting used to the buses – luckily, the stops are read out in English and you can see a bit of a map on a digital screen so you don’t really have the opportunity to get lost. Like the bus in Koyasan, you get on at the back and exit at the front, paying your fare in a little machine at the front on the way out. If you don’t have the exact change, then there’s also a little change box. In Kyoto, it was just one fare per journey within a zone. You can also get an all day bus ticket for 500 Yen which I did on the second day as there were a lot of things that I wanted to see which were quite spread out. Another good place I visited (and confess that I came back to for lunch on more than one occasion) was the Nishiki market full of independent stalls, mostly selling food. IMG_4500IMG_4296IMG_4599Yes – this is pickled cucumber on a stick….The variety was amazing and there was lots of things I had not seen before. The amount of different types of pickles and seaweed you could taste was phenomenal. It sits along one long street under cover which is parallel to the street my hostel was on (which was basically Kyoto’s version of Oxford Street – it had all the nice shops on. Even a L’Occitane!). I spent a lot of time here trying a couple of things – a lunch based on free samples is alway a good idea. I had the most amazing gyoza in a little place not too far from my hostel called Tiger Gyoza Hall. I liked to watch the chefs work. They were all drinking pints of Asahi on the job as well.IMG_4351The second day was mostly spent getting from place to place by bus. It had meant to rain all day as well (but didn’t in the end) so I thought it would be a good idea. I had checked to see the temples that I wanted to go to the night before, and with the help of Google Maps, I knew which buses to take. They were quite regular as well which helped. I started the day off by getting to the Heian Jingu temple which is north east of the city. It was quite big and there was a nice garden with ponds of water lilies, and is a popular spot for cherry blossom during the spring. It’s not as old as some of the other temples, but still quite grand. IMG_4360IMG_4362IMG_4366IMG_4371IMG_4377IMG_4390Then went to the Yasaka Shrine which is in Marauyama Park. This was fairly big and tranquil and had a lot of lanterns. It was founded over 1350 years ago. The park is also a famous spot for cherry blossom.The next stop was Sanjusangendo temple which houses 1000 statues of Kannon (the goddess of mercy) all standing in a row, as well as one big statue of the same goddess in the middle. The length of the wooden hall make it the longest wooden structure in Japan. The statues are flanked with some bigger statues in front which are meant to be defenders and protectors. The temple was initially constructed in 1164. IMG_4397IMG_4401Another temple visited was Kodaji temple, as well as Entokuinteien temple. Kodaji is a Zen temple and was built in the 1606 by Kita-no-Mandokoro in memory of her late husband. They are both enshrined there in the memorial hall. Here you have to walk around the cylinders and rotate them with one hand as you go round. It is meant to be good luck. Throughout Japan, I have seen a lot of non Japanese people wearing kimonos – I then often saw them available for rent in certain places, so I assume you can hire them for a day.IMG_4428IMG_4429IMG_4431IMG_4435IMG_4439IMG_4450I ended up walking down Matsubara Dori and Matsubara Kyogoku which are pedestrianised shopping streets full of unique shops. It was fairly crowded and it was easy to see why. IMG_4487There were little different coloured soaps which were squishy and each colour meant that a different ingredient would be in each soap depending on whether you wanted moisturisation or something else. IMG_4483Squidgy soap (above)IMG_4493Yummy confectionary! Each triangle filled with something different – strawberry etcIMG_4481Rice cakes in soy sauce (above)IMG_4448Green tea ice cream! I was not such a huge fan…I still don’t like green tea. And I’ve been fed it a lot….I found the street where the Geishas are meant to be found. This was just off the main street. The buildings were quite pretty. IMG_4507IMG_4519IMG_4719I treated myself to some nice sushi after a long day from a place called Chojiro which had had good reviews on Trip Advisor.IMG_4524IMG_4525IMG_4529The next day, I was up and out early to see the bamboo forest in Arashiyama and the Japanese garden with an amazing view. There was also a temple called Tenryu-Ji which I visited and it is a grand Zen temple. It was originally built in 1339, but has been rebuilt over the centuries, like so many other temples. IMG_4544IMG_4549IMG_4555IMG_4556IMG_4560IMG_4565IMG_4580IMG_4591IMG_4597IMG_4608Then finished Kyoto off with seeing Fushimi Inari-taisha which was amazing. The 10,000 red torri gates were all donated by worshippers and their names and the dates they were donated are inscribed on the gates. You can climb up the many steps to get to the summit of Mount Inari. It took a couple of hours to do the big loop and had a couple of great views. The mountain reaches an elevation of 233 metres. It is a Shinto shrine. There are a lot of stone foxes with a red cloak surrounding certain shrines at certain points as you are climbing up. IMG_4672IMG_4685IMG_4692IMG_4698IMG_4700IMG_4703IMG_4709I really enjoyed my time in Kyoto – a big place full of things to see and lots to eat! A buzzing city working with its traditional roots. There’s a real sense of respect for religion and others. Onwards to Tokyo!

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